December 23rd, 2013 · Articles

This past February, Jack Nicholson and Jennifer Lawrence made viral video magic when the two met-cute/creepy backstage at the Oscars. While best-actress winner Lawrence taped an interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Nicholson lurked in the background, on deck to congratulate Hollywood’s newly-minted Academy Award owner. After patiently waiting, and wiping sweat from his forehead, Nicholson finally bum-rushed the segment mid-interview to tell Lawrence that she “did such a beautiful job” and he “loved” her in Silver Linings Playbook. Lawrence, as charming as ever, whet Nicholson’s appetite by firing back that the 76-year-old legend was “being really rude” by interrupting her segment. Nicholson—clearly smitten, as we all are, by J. Law—left her side, and then snuck back up once more to creepily tell her, “I’ll be waiting.”

And waiting he apparently was. Lawrence, who was just named “Entertainer of the Year” by the Associated Press, tells ABC that after meeting Nicholson, she received a care package from the elder Oscar winner containing the bubbly and a flirty note that sounds typical of the storied ladies’ man. “He sent me flowers and a bottle of Cristal and a note that said, ‘Missing you already,” Lawrence told ABC News’ Bianna Golodryga, before adding. “Not to brag. I should have probably kept that a secret so it could just be between me and Jack.”

Last month, Lawrence played a little bit more coy when asked if she had kept in touch with Nicholson. “Oh. . . are we dating?,” she asked Extra TV. “Are we an item? “I’’m not going to say what he did or didn’t do. He could have or could not have sent me flowers and a bottle of Cristal.”

Lawrence revealed that she did not dare drink the sacred gift from Nicholson—perhaps for fear that it was laced with a love serum that would make her fall for the actor five decades her senior. “I’ve never tasted Cristal in my whole life,” she said, adding that she sent the gift to her parents. “[M]y mom has my Oscar and my Jack Nicholson champagne.” Rationalizing her kindness to her mother, she said, “She like pulled me out of her body. It’s the least I can do.”

The old-fashioned champagne and flowers courtship strategy may have backfired for Nicholson, but if we know Jack, the actor has not given up and is busy hand-painting Lawrence a bull figurine as we blog.

Tip of the hat to our very own Richard Lawson, who predicted that Nicholson and Lawrence would cross paths again—however not in a fizzled-out flirtation that makes for great talk show fodder. He suggested that the pair team up for a James L. Brooks comedy in which he actor accepts the more age-appropriate role of “father” to Lawrence’s character, a computer genius.

See the video from the Oscars:

Source

December 21st, 2013 · Articles

Scans from the issue are available in the gallery, many thanks to Luciana. And below is a preview of the article:



The cast talks with TheWrap about the director’s unconventional approach while filming the period tale

There’s never been a film quite like “American Hustle.”

The bellbottoms, big hair, coke snorting and propulsive pop soundtrack evoke earlier ’70s throwbacks, like “Boogie Nights” and “Anchorman.” And the story of crooked politicians, charming con artists and the feds who bring them together is reminiscent of caper movies like “Ocean’s Eleven.” Yet “American Hustle” still defies all expectations — it’s funny and tragic, often at the same moment, and a masterpiece of shifting moods.

The movie serves as a coda in a trilogy of reinvention for director David O. Russell, whose last two works, “Silver Linings Playbook” and “The Fighter,” together scored 15 Academy Award nominations (including Best Picture for both) and won three Oscars for acting. “I want to do movies that are rooted in characters and that are based on their emotional lives and their struggles for survival and desire for reinvention,” Russell told TheWrap. “This theme of reinvention is what leapt out at me. It’s very American.”

That American theme binds the trilogy together, even though the films seem wildly different on the surface. “The Fighter” is an inspirational boxing movie with vivid and often comic characters. “Silver Linings Playbook” is a charming romantic comedy, with drops of pathos mixed in to leaven 
the uplift. And “American Hustle” riffs on 
the crime genre, dramatizing one of the most bizarre moments in law-enforcement history: the Abscam operation in which FBI employees posed as Arab sheiks in an effort to catch public officials on the take.

Read the rest of the article at thewrap.com

December 21st, 2013 · Photoshoots, Scans

Some scans and photoshoots have been added to the gallery, thanks Luciana, Marica and Claudia.




Gallery Links:

December 19th, 2013 · Interviews

A Clip from Conan O’Brien

December 18th, 2013 · Awards

Jennifer has been nominated for the 19th Annual Critics Choice Awards as Best Supporting Actress for American Hustle and Best Actress in an Action Movie for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

American Hustle has gotten a total of 13 nominations for Best Picture, Best Actor for Christian Bale, Best Supporting Actor for Bradley Cooper, Best Acting Ensemble, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Editing, Best Costume Design, Best Makeup, Best Comedy, Best Actor in a Comedy for Christian Bale, Best Actress in a Comedy for Amy Adams.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire has been nominated for a total of 3 awards including Best Action Movie and Best Song for Atlas from Coldplay.

The Critics Choice Awards winners will be announced on January 16th, 2014.

December 18th, 2013 · Interviews

Here’s a Preview of Barbara Walters Presents: The 10 Most Fascinating People of 2013, which airs wednesday at 9:30 p.m. ET


Jennifer Lawrence said ”it should be illegal” to call someone fat and, in an interview with Barbara Walters, railed against people who bash the way women look.

“Because why is humiliating people funny?” the 23-year-old Oscar winner told Walters in an interview for the upcoming ABC News special, “Barbara Walters Presents: The 10 Most Fascinating People of 2013.”

“I just think it should be illegal to call somebody fat on TV.”

Lawrence became Hollywood’s new “It” girl after she was picked to play Katniss Everdeen, the heroine in the film adaptations of the “Hunger Games” series. It’s a role that launched Lawrence to mega-stardom. Since stepping into the spotlight, Lawrence has been criticized for her figure, considered full by Hollywood standards, and it makes her furious.
“I get it, and, and I do it too, we all do it,” she told Walters. “[But] the media needs to take responsibility for the effect that it has on our younger generation, on these girls who are watching these television shows, and picking up how to talk and how to be cool.

“I mean, if we’re regulating cigarettes and sex and cuss words, because of the effect they have on our younger generation, why aren’t we regulating things like calling people fat?” she said.

Source

December 14th, 2013 · American Hustle

Jennifer Lawrence and Amy Adams in American Hustle

Christian Bale and Bradley Cooper may have top billing in American Hustle, director David O. Russell’s madcap seventies crime epic, but it’s the film’s knockout dames, Amy Adams and Jennifer Lawrence, who ultimately steal the show. Adams plays Sydney, the lover and partner of conman Irving (Bale), while Lawrence plays Rosalyn, Irving’s wife, who’s poised to spoil his deal with crazed cop Richie (Cooper). Together, they prove why they’re two of our finest actresses, inhabiting roles unlike any either star has played before.

When we caught up with Adams (who continues to fascinate us with the unexpected grit beneath her sunny persona) and Lawrence (whose mix of humor and bemusement only makes her more compelling), both women were more than ready to talk about crafting their characters, dancing with Cooper, and their incredible shared kiss.

On David O. Russell’s knack for creating hyperreal yet completely realistic stories:

AMY ADAMS: Not everything in reality is subtle and slow. When I lose my cool, it is over the top. That’s how we are as humans. What David really does, I feel, is exemplify reality. He finds moments in people’s lives where this so-called “pushed” reality is the truth for these characters.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE: Sometimes real life can be so dramatic and so awful that it’s actually kind of funny. But, above anything else, David’s characters are so incredible, and you have so much emotional freedom, that sometimes what’s on the page turns into something completely different as David’s yelling these ideas and you’re on your toes.

On the best part of playing the rare, well-developed female role:

AMY ADAMS: My favorite part of the process was playing with the vulnerability of my character. She has this veneer, this physicality, and this power, but if I don’t ground that in any true emotion, it’s not going to be that much fun to play, because there are no layers. David always makes sure that his characters are multidimensional and that his women, specifically, are multidimensional. Playing with those dimensions is just a thrill as an actress.

On their kiss, which Adams came up with and Lawrence knocked out of the park:

AMY ADAMS: I feel like Jennifer really made that contribution. I came up with the idea, but she executed it in a way that felt purely driven from character. It didn’t just feel like a moment in which two girls are going to kiss onscreen. It was from somewhere emotional. I mean, she killed it. And that laugh she gives after? I mean, come on now. Genius. I didn’t tell her do that. All I thought was, “What if she plants one on her?” And Jennifer did that in a brilliant way that sells it comically and dramatically. It never feels like it shouldn’t have been there. It feels so organic. And that’s all due to Jennifer.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE: [Whispers] Thanks, Amy.

On getting down with the song and dance of American Hustle:

JENNIFER LAWRENCE: David came to me before we started shooting, and he said he had a vision of Rosalyn wearing yellow cleaning gloves and running through the entire house singing [Paul McCartney's] “Live and Let Die.” And I thought that sounded incredible, but how’s it going to make sense? I’m usually so stupid with these things. I’m just like, “Yeah, I’ll dance, I’ll sing, whatever!” But I think this song [signifies how] Rosalyn is so angry, and she’s at this point where she’s been lied to for so long. And she’s getting to this point in her marriage, which she’s been fighting for for so long, where she’s finally ready to just let it die. So it was just a really great, crazy moment. I threw my neck out, actually.

AMY ADAMS: I was trained as a dancer, and dancing with Bradley was awesome. He’s such an amazing dancer. It was so much fun.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE: You should have danced with me.

AMY ADAMS: There’s still time!

On using sexuality to get into character:

AMY ADAMS: One part of how I storytell has always been through my body. I find a character through movement. And one of the things that struck me once I had the wardrobe and I knew that Sydney was going to be a sexual being, was the thought of people who also had an elegance with their sexuality and the power expressed through their sexuality. So for me, dancing, again was kind of how I started to feel Sydney. I thought about Ann-Margret and Syd Charice and these women who seemed like they were in control because of the way they moved their bodies.

On playing female cons who are constantly juggling fact and fiction:

AMY ADAMS: It was a very delicate balance. Sydney is a girl who says she wants to be anyone other than who she is. And that’s where we meet her. She’s already at a point of reinvention. She meets Irving, and he presents to her who she wants to be. He sees her as smart and intelligent and as a lady. She loves him and feels found. And then he betrays her. That’s not cool. [Laughs] But I think there are moments where she’s not sure how she feels, and she’s starting to believe her own lies. Maybe things could work with Richie, and maybe she does like him. And it was a really interesting dynamic to play a woman who’s not so much torn between two guys, but between truth and a lie. I think she really just wants somebody to see the truth of who she is. I think every girl knows how that feels—she’s just a little crazy about it.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE: It really just comes down to a study of people. It’s all of these things that I’ve been doing since I was little that were useless—just watching people and studying them and being able to mimic their body language and things like that. And being able to find a person. What kind of person are you playing? How do they move? How do they walk? Between “action” and “cut,” for me, it’s almost like meditating, in a weird way. Like, if I’m cold, in between “action” and “cut” I’m not. Or if I’m in physical pain, in between “action” and “cut” I’m not. I’m in a completely different frame of mind. It’s a high.

Source

December 12th, 2013 · American Hustle

A new TV Spot for American Hustle is out

December 12th, 2013 · American Hustle

Jennifer Lawrence has received a nomination for the 71st Golden Globe Awards Nomination in the Best Supporting Actress Category for her role in American Hustle.

She released this statement earlier today:

Thank you to the HFPA. This is so exciting. I’m thrilled that the film received so many nominations and that I get to share this with the rest of the cast.

American Hustle has also been nominated for Best Motion Picture Comedy or Musical, Best Actor and Actress in Comedy or Musical for Christian Bale and Amy Adams, and Best Supporting Actor for Bradley Cooper. The movie has been nominated for Best Screenplay and Best Director.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire has been nominated for Best Original Song with Atlas.

The 71st Golden Globe Awards winners will be announced on January 12th, 2014.

December 12th, 2013 · American Hustle

The Nominations for the 2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards Nominations are out and Jennifer has been nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her role in American Hustle.

The cast has also been nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture.

The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will air on January 18th.

December 9th, 2013 · American Hustle

Jen attended the Press Conference for American Hustle in New York last saturday, here are pictures, thanks to Nicole:

Gallery Link:

December 9th, 2013 · Magazines

Jennifer is featured on the December issue of Best Movie from Italy, with an article on American Hustle, scans thanks to Claudia

December 9th, 2013 · American Hustle

Time Entertainment has a review on American Hustle:

American Hustle: Sex, Scandal and Flat-Out Fun

Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence form a fabulous ensemble cast in David O. Russell’s dramatic comedy about the Abscam scandal

Irving Rosenfeld approaches the bathroom mirror without bothering to ask who’s the fairest of them all. Paunchy of gut and bald on top, he knows he has work to do. Like a surgeon of sleaze, he glues a toupee thatch to his pate, arranges the lank hair on his temples across his skull and shellacs the whole mop with hair spray. Now he just needs to suck in his gut and don a three-piece suit and — voilà! — he’s 1970s New Jersey’s idea of a presentable businessman. Or con man, that is: Irving sells art forgeries and takes money for investments in fantasy companies. Charles Ponzi might say, with a connoisseur’s appreciation, “Now that’s a schemer.”

You watch the first scene of American Hustle and think, That’s Christian Bale doing another of his life-imperiling body transformations. Bale lost 62 lb., from a muscular 182 to an emaciated 120, for the lead role in The Machinist; somehow he survived. This time he gained 40 lb. and walked with an older man’s slouch. For his trouble, he herniated two discs. He also crept inside Irving’s body and spirit to play — no, to convincingly be — a grifter working the long con. Doesn’t everybody, really, through white lies and easy evasions? “We’re all conning ourselves one way or another,” Irving-Bale says, “just to get through life.”

The best way we can think of to get through 140 minutes of your life would be to see American Hustle, a balls-out story about political corruption that director and co-writer David O. Russell turned into a crazy, conniving comedy: history replayed as sparkling farce. Russell reunited the star pairs from his last two films — Bale and Amy Adams from The Fighter, Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence from Silver Linings Playbook — then Cuisinarted the romantic alliances until everyone had a chance to get screwed in one way or another. The New York Film Critics Circle recently acknowledged the toxic, tonic splendor of American Hustle by giving it awards for Best Film, Best Supporting Actress (Lawrence) and Best Screenplay (Eric Warren Singer and Russell). These should be the first of many awards from now until Oscar night.

December 9th, 2013 · Interviews

The Oscar winner is earning raves again for playing a demented housewife.

EW YORK — Work can be your salvation, your port in a mad, mad celebrity storm. Just ask Jennifer Lawrence, who finds solace and consistency on movie sets, surrounded by people who don’t care about her latest sultry Dior ads, or whether her new haircut is too extreme.

“Nobody treats you any differently. They see celebrities all the time. Especially on The Hunger Games, people have known each other for years. I feel like myself,” she says.

Her first day back on set, one day after winning an Oscar for Silver Linings Playbook, Lawrence earned a standing ovation from her Hunger Games: Catching Fire cast and crew.

“And then, nothing changed. We shot two more weeks in the mud. When she messes up her lines, she gets teased by Woody (Harrelson) that she’s going to have to give her award back,” says Fire director Francis Lawrence (no relation). “She’s smart and goofy and silly and talented and endearing. It’s all of those things. There isn’t an actress around like her right now. She has an intuitive talent for acting, but also a soul and gravitas that most girls her age don’t have. She captures the loneliness of Katniss.”

And the blowsy appeal of Rosalyn Rosenfeld, the lonely, yet certifiable housewife she plays in American Hustle. When filmmaker David O. Russell, who directed Lawrence to her Oscar for playing a disturbed, acid-tongued, yet vulnerable widow in Silver Linings, called her about Hustle, she had planned to take a break. But the script, about a ’70s scammer (Christian Bale), his pushy spouse (Lawrence), his manipulative mistress (Amy Adams) and the memorably coiffed, deeply ambitious FBI agent trying to get a career break (Bradley Cooper), proved irresistible.

“(Rosalyn’s) always screaming and drinking and you don’t know why. The first step was making her young, making her religious and making her someone I could forgive. She’s dumb as a fox. She doesn’t know any better. She doesn’t understand the repercussions of her actions,” says Lawrence. “She chooses when to be blind to something and I know women like that. You know those women who find themselves in very dramatic situations and don’t understand why.”

And for Russell, seeing Lawrence embody someone so comically, almost defiantly, deviant was a revelation.

“We’ve never seen her do a character like this. It was alive and freeing and fun, and she brought amazing energy to it. Her peculiar madness is her genius,” Russell says. “Jennifer and I share a process on the set where we laugh and we stay loose. But when she goes in, it’s on. It’s deceptive to everyone around. She looks like she’s goofing around and not paying attention. But she goes there. Magic happens.”

December 9th, 2013 · Interviews

Franchises and awards aside, the 23-year-old actress craves a life away from the red carpet.

NEW YORK — Behind the clever banter and disarming repartee, beyond the glamorous red-carpet Dior gowns, in a private dining room on the second floor of a downtown hotel, her loafer-clad feet kicked up behind her, sits the real Jennifer Lawrence.

And all this actress wants, right now, is a Corona. Or an Amstel Light. But the only brews available are of the artisanal variety, so Lawrence looks flummoxed. “I’m a Budweiser person. So I don’t really understand,” she says, as the waitress goes to great lengths to explain the intricate differences between the pale ales on offer.

Away from the awards-season hubbub, which again envelopes her for her role as a foxy yet foolish wife in American Hustle, Lawrence is a self-aware woman trying to have some version of a regular existence. “I’ve built my career. I need to build my human life. I need to get a house and connect to the people around me and not work for a little while,” she says.

Topping her to-do list: buying a home when she wraps the two-part Hunger Games franchise finale, Mockingjay, which shoots until June.

But for now, she does her best to retain some sense of routine in an existence that’s mostly lived in hotels, fueled by room service. Her on-again boyfriend, Nicholas Hoult, helps keep her sane, away from prying eyes. “We’re really good at it,” she says of maintaining their under-the-radar romance.

She’s infatuated with her two young nephews, whom she FaceTimes every night. She decompresses by watching reality TV, in particular Keeping Up with the Kardashians. And she keeps her best-actress Oscar, won for last year’s Silver Linings Playbook, at her mom’s house to avoid any weirdness when friends come over, to try to nip in the bud the possibility of people standing at attention around her.

“I just get allergic to that kind of thing. People treating you differently when you don’t feel any differently is really alienating. You can see, the way they look at you. I can see if that was who I surrounded myself with, that’s why you change,” she says. “I find people who don’t change. That’s where I get my reality.”

And her ability to say exactly the right thing at the right time? It’s a gift. “She’s an amazing study of people. She really understands the teeniest differences in people. She can read people in a second,” says The Hunger Games: Catching Fire director Francis Lawrence. “She can figure you out in an instant. She does it with such ease, from the gut.”

Source
Video after the cut:

Social Networks


Projects

X-Men: Days of Future Past
Jennifer as Raven/Mystique
On Theathers on May 23rd, 2014
News | Photos | IMDb



The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1
Jennifer as Katniss Everdeen
On Theathers on November 21st, 2014
News | Photos | IMDb



The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2
Jennifer as Katniss Everdeen
On Theathers on November 20th, 2014
News | Photos | IMDb



Serena
Jennifer as Serena Pemberton
To be released in 2014
News | Photos | IMDb


Rumored
  • Dumb and Dumber To (Cameo) - 2014
  • The Glass Castle (Rumored)
  • East of Eden (Rumored)
  • Burial Rites (Rumored)
Latest Photos
Site Info
Webmaster: Annie
Site Name: Jennifer Lawrence Network
Domain: Jen-Lawrence.Com
Previous Webmiss & Staff: Fram, Sian, Marica
Contact: webmaster@jen-lawrence.com
Since: January 10, 2011

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5 other subscribers